Sepsis Awareness Month: Why Our Program Actually Works

By: Portia Wofford

Home health clinicians play an essential role in caring for patients who are:

  1. At risk of developing sepsis
  2. Recovering from sepsis or septic shock

Home health providers are vital in preventing hospital admissions and readmission among sepsis patients. According to the CDC, sepsis is the body’s extreme response to an infection. It is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency.

Many patients receiving home healthcare services have chronic medical conditions and comorbidities that put them at risk for infection, including COVID-19 and sepsis. According to the Global Sepsis Alliance, COVID-19 can cause sepsis. Research suggests that COVID-19 may lead to sepsis due to several reasons, including:

  • Direct viral invasion
  • Presence of a bacterial or viral co-co-infection
  • Age of the patient

According to Homecare Magazine, approximately 80% of people with COVID-19 will have a mild course and recover without hospitalization. The remaining 20% of patients with COVID-19 may develop sepsis and be admitted. Patients with severe illness will need home health care.

A study published in Medical Care by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) suggests that when strategically implemented, home health care can play an essential role in reducing hospital readmissions for patients recovering from sepsis. According to Home Health Care News, the study points out that sepsis survivors who were less likely to return to the hospital if they:

  1. Received a home health visit within 48 hours of hospital discharge
  2. Had at least one additional visit and
  3. Had physician visit within their first week of discharge

According to the findings, these interventions reduced 30-day all-cause readmissions by seven percentage points.

Home health clinicians are trained to monitor patients and identify signs and symptoms of sepsis. Additionally, they can teach patients and their caregivers how to prevent and recognize sepsis. According to research and estimates, rapid diagnosis and treatment could prevent 80% of sepsis deaths.

Home health care can contribute to early detection of sepsis

Early detection is critical. For each hour treatment initiation is delayed after diagnosis, the mortality rate increases 8%. Home health nurses can monitor and educate patients and their caregivers on signs and symptoms to report to include. Additionally, home healthcare agencies can provide screening tools that fill the gaps in identifying at-risk patients during transitions from inpatient to outpatient settings.

Home health provides case management for chronic comorbidities

  1. Some comorbidities like Type 2 Diabetes, chronic heart disease, and dementia were associated with sepsis risk in almost all infection types. Those with other chronic illnesses, cancer, and an impaired immune system are also at increased risk. Monitoring can help reduce risks.
  2. Post-discharge and follow-up visits, including telehealth visits, may provide positive intervention for post sepsis patients.
  3. Nurses can review and coordinate care to adjust medications, evaluate treatments and interventions, and refer for appropriate treatment.

When it comes to serious complications, our sepsis program effectively:

  • Prevents infections that can lead to sepsis
  • Recognizes sepsis symptoms before they become severe
  • Rapidly responds if sepsis symptoms occur by initiating appropriate treatments and referrals
  • Follows-up with care to ensure continued recovery

Abode’s sepsis program promotes quality of care and improves outcomes for those at risk for developing or recovering from sepsis.